Module A – Donne and Edson | HSC English Module A Study Notes

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Study Notes for HSC Module A – poetry of Johne Donne and Margaret Edson's Wit.

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Module A – Donne and Edson – HSC English Study Notes

Module A – Donne and Edson study notes have been composed specifically to target the requirements for the HSC English Module A – the poetry of Johne Donne and Margaret Edson’s Wit.

HSC English Module A – Johne Donne and Margaret Edson

What’s Included in Your 30 page Study Notes on Module A – Donne and Edson:

  • MODULE A-­‐ Paper 2

  • Understanding the texts selected for Module A: Elective 1 : Inter textual Connections
  • Poetry of John Donne and Margaret Edson’s Wit.
  • I. DONNE

  • a. Overview
    • i. Love poetry
    • ii. Holy Sonnets
  • b. Context
    • i. Political upheaval
    • ii. Influence of religion
    • iii. Renaissance Humanism
    • iv. The Elizabethan world order
  • II. EDSON

  • a. Overview
  • b. Context
    • i. Spiritual uncertainty and influence of secularism
    • ii. Patriarchy
    • iii. The deference to technocrats
    • iv. Individualism and power
  • III. THEME 1: LOVE (A Valediction Forbidding Mourning)

    • a. A Valediction Forbidding Mourning and the theme of Love
    • b. Wit and the theme of Love
    • c. Comparison of texts
  • IV. Theme 2: Death (Death Be Not Proud)

    • a. Death Be Not Proud and the theme of death
    • b. Wit and the theme of Death
    • c. Comparison of texts
  • V. THEME 3: Salvation and mercy (This is my playes last scene)

    • a. This Is My Playes Last Scene and the theme of Mercy and Salvation
    • b. Wit and the theme of salvation and mercy
    • c. Comparison of texts

HSC Notes on Module A – Donne and Edson – The Perfect Study Companion

1 review for Module A – Donne and Edson | HSC English Module A Study Notes

  1. 3 out of 5

    The repeated references to religious iconography and expressions in the later stanzas of the poem show the need for this movement to have a religious element to it. The enduring metaphor of man and woman as the two legs of a compass, drawn together by their relationship provides again an interesting dimension to the Cartesian Duality problem in Donne’s poetry, whereby the poems stand on the edge between flesh and soul, and use elements of each to add to the other. Religious iconography refers to symbols and images that are commonly associated with a particular religion.

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